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Hotel Slavija (4*)

Split [Diocletian's Palace]

About Hotel Slavija

The history of the building in which we find the Hotel Slavija can be traced back to the end of the 16th and early 17th century, when it was above the western Diocletian baths, built as a complex of Renaissance / Baroque palaces. In the early 20th century the palace was adapted to the Hotel Slavija and it was the first Hotel in Split and was home to lot of famous poets, artists, athletes … Renaissance stairs lead inside Hotel Slavija, this stairs are the last monument of this period within the walls of the Palace.

Hotel Slavija is protected by Republic of Croatia as a national cultural heritage. Due to its location within Diocletian’s Palace, Hotel Slavija is also protected by UNESCO as an international monument of culture. You can observe how Hotel Slavija looked in the 20th century on the postcards you will find all over the world of Split. Once you arrive at the Hotel you will see that the exterior hasn’t changed at all.

The port of Split and the main train and bus stations are 350 metres away. The Slavija Hotel is right next to the Jupiter Sanctuary, and only 40 yards from Split Cathedral.

This hotel is available as part of any tailor made holiday with Rediscover the World.

Accommodation:
A total of 25 rooms, standard & superior (single, double, triple and quad rooms available); superior rooms have a private terrace. All rooms are bright and comfortable, carpeted and equipped with air-conditioning, phone, cable TV, private bathroom with a shower and a hairdryer and free toiletries. An iron and ironing board is available upon request and free of charge; babycots are available upon request, free of charge, but are subject to availability. The hotel offers WiFi Internet access free of charge.

Facilities:
Guests can start their day with the continental breakfast served each morning in the restaurant or in the room, and the service is free of charge. A summertime terrace opens on the rooftop with a panoramic view; half board and full board also available. Guests of the Slavija enjoy reductions at some of the nearby restaurants.

Restaurant in Roman baths - the hotel restaurant is built over the area of the antique roman thermae of the Diocletian’s palace, a sort of a forerunner of the welness and spa of today. According to the beliefs of the ancient Romans, taking baths, combined with healthy eating, massages and excercise was the key to good health. The area that had all of this in one place were the public baths called thermae (latin, derived from the greek “thermos” – warm). In other aspects, the baths can be imagined as a combination of todays library, a gallery, a restaurant, marketplace, fitness gym, a swimming pool and a sauna. These spectacular buildings of the Roman Empire were a central meeting point, a place to relax and socialize with the other members of the community – rich or poor, free or slaves, women and men, children and adults) and were an important part of the life of the old Romans.

The pools were mostly located in the apsidas of the rooms (a half-dome parts of a building) that can be seen in the main hall of the restaurant. The central floor of the restaurant is built above the hypocaust, a sort of a floor heating system that was used in the baths at that time. Hypocaust is the area below the floor, consisting of pillars that were holding the floor, trough which hot air was let to pass, thus heating the rooms above. While today the hypocaust in the floor was covered in order to preserve it, the apsidas are partly visible.

Together with the public baths, private ones existed too, and they were reserved only to the emperor and the members of his family. One example of such a type of baths is located in the Diocletian’s palace. To the both sides of the southern part of the palace thermal buildings existed – the eastern baths and the western baths. The latter were connected to the emperor’s residential chambers, and in their most part they are located on the ground level of the Slavija hotel. Hotel’s restaurant is located on the area that once were the most important rooms of the emperor’s baths – the caldarium, tepidarium and  frigidarium. The baths are an unbelievable accomplishment in the field of architecture of the Roman Age, and their remnants are preserved and kept safe with pride in the restaurant and hotel.

  • Boutique
  • 21-50 rooms
  • Restaurant
  • Family rooms available
  • Ideal for families
  • Ideal for couples
  • Ideal for fly drives

Reviews

"Loved Split, and the hotel there; will definitely go back. Kastela much quieter resort - if it can be called that - but perfectly located for exploring the area."

S Taylor, July 2016

"Having requested a quiet room at Hotel Slavija, after a sleepless first night, we were told such a thing does not exist as it is a town centre hotel. Reception staff were extremely nice and helpful and they did move us up a floor for the 2nd night which helped but a less central hotel, not surrounded by bars and restaurants, would have suited us better. Also at breakfast Mike asked for toast with his bacon and eggs and was refused. Apparently it wasn't on the bed and breakfast menu!"

E Langley, Sept 2016

"Hotel Slavia in Split was very convenient and reception was helpful. However the service at breakfast was very disappointing. It was a buffet but coffee tea eggs etc were available but we had to go and ask for them. Nothing was volunteered. I don't want to sound at all negative because we very much enjoyed the whole holiday, and the slight complaints above are just for your info."

C Fox, Sept 2016

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